Community Eye Health Journal

Community Eye Health Journal

Improving eye health through the delivery of practical high-quality information for the eye care team
  1. Nepal: self-reliant in ophthalmic human resources
    In the early 1980s, Nepal barely had any eye care professionals – neither ophthalmologists nor ophthalmic assistants. In three decades this was addressed systematically and Nepal now has a significant workforce, adequate in-country training capacity and training ophthalmologists for other developing countries in Asia. Nepal’s incredible journey is an inspiration for other developing countries.
  2. VISION 2020 INDIA’s annual conference
    The key outcomes of the VISION 2020 INDIA’s annual conference this year was the submission of six recommendations on improving the Health Management Information System (HMIS) to the National Programme for Control of Blindness (NPCB), the nodal body in charge of blindness programmes in India.
  3. Evidence-based management of eye care delivery
    This article is the the first in series on evidence based eye care delivery. The series highlights the importance of using evidence for planning and effectively managing eye care – both at programme and hospital levels.
  4. Effective engagement of community health workers in primary eye care in India
    Active and sustained involvement of existing community health workers in primary eye care service can help South Asian countries tackle a major challenge in the region - lack of trained human resources.
  5. Football to eyeball: thinking out of the box to create an ophthalmic talent pool in difficult geographies
    To create and retain locally available pool of ophthalmic talent, thinking out of the box has helped Akhand Jyoti Eye Hospital to recruit, train and retain local talent successfully.
  6. Building an eye care team in rural areas: a central Indian case study
    If attracting, retaining and motivating eye care professionals to give their best is challenge in cities it is a seemingly impossible task in remote rural areas. Sadguru Nethra Chikitsalaya (SNC) at Chitrakoot is one of the few hospitals that have turned its rural setting to its advantage. Strategies and details described in this article will help countless other institutions that are struggling with similar issues.
  7. Competency-based assessment as a reliable skill building strategy for allied ophthalmic personnel
    Developing a cadre of allied ophthalmic personnel poses a particular challenge for ophthalmic institutes as there are no accredited standards or curricula in most of the countries in the developing world. Competency-based assessments are gaining acceptance as they allow students to demonstrate mastery over a subject and earn competency without adhering to a rigid course schedule.
  8. Paediatric eye care team: a comprehensive approach
    When India’s capacity for paediatric eye care presented itself as a mammoth challenge, India Childhood Blindness Initiative (ICBI) was launched by Orbis to help ensure that India’s children have access to quality eye care. These efforts have not only contributed towards building the capacity of various cadres of eye health professionals but have systematically created a milieu where paediatric ophthalmology could develop and flourish.
  9. Human Resources for eye health in South Asia
    Human resources in the right numbers, mix and distribution are key to ensuring universal eye health. It is imperative to get a good sense of the current status and challenges in the different countries in South Asia.
  10. Investment in human resources improves eye health for all
    There is a widening gap between the need for eye health workers and their availability in low-income countries. Change will come once governments recognise the health workforce as a productive investment, not an expense.

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